Department of Social Sciences.

About the department

The Social Sciences Department currently comprise of 2 4-year Honours degree programmes in Psychology and Sociology, and one 3-year degree programme in Sociology/Psychology.The Department has two graduate programmes run on part-time basis. Plans are at an advanced stage to launch a doctoral program in Child Rights and Family Studies. A number of new degrees, diploma and certificate programmes in the areas of capital management, development studies, research methods etc. will soon be introduced. The following are the programmes on offer in the Department:

  1. Bachelor of Social Sciences in Psychology (Honours)
  2. Bachelor of Social Sciences in Sociology (Honours)
  3. Master of Science in Child and Family Studies
  4. Master of Science in Child Rights and Childhood Studies
Basic Entry Requirements

5 ‘O’ level passes including English Language and Mathematics. At least two GCE Advanced level passes or equivalent.

Click here for More information about this programme.


Basic Entry Requirements

5 ‘O’ level passes including English Language and Mathematics. At least two GCE Advanced level passes or equivalent.

Click here for More information about this programme.


Basic Entry Requirements

5 ‘O’ level passes including English Language and Mathematics. At least two GCE Advanced level passes or equivalent.

Click here for More information about this programme.


Basic Entry Requirements

5 ‘O’ level passes including English Language and Mathematics. At least two GCE Advanced level passes or equivalent.

Click here for More information about this programme.


Basic Entry Requirements

5 ‘O’ level passes including English Language and Mathematics. At least two GCE Advanced level passes or equivalent.

Click here for More information about this programme.


Basic Entry Requirements

Master of Science in Child Rights and Childhood Studies.

Click here for More information about this programme.


Basic Entry Requirements

A good first degree in a relevant area.

Click here for More information about this programme.


Basic Entry Requirements

A good first degree in a relevant area.

Click here for More information about this programme.


Basic Entry Requirements

A candidate applying for admission into a Doctoral Degree programme at Africa University must possess a Master’s degree in the relevant field of study. In addition, the candidate must provide official transcripts as evidence of the following:

  1. coursework in a relevant field of study at the Masters level AND
  2. A minimum Cumulative Grade Point Average of 3.0 (B) or equivalent at the Masters level.
  3. As part of the application process, all doctoral degree applicants must provide a copy of their Master’s degree dissertation as evidence of their research accomplishments.
  4. The CSSTHE Board will recommend for admission to the GSC, applicants who obtained a Master’s degree by research.
  5. Applicants should submit with their applications a Motivation Statement written in English.
  6. As part of the application process, applicants will be required to have an interview with the CSSTHE. If so, the interview will be conducted in English.

Click here for More information about this programme.


Research and outreach

  1. Skin bleaching and aspirational masculinities in Mutare
  2. Violence as a deployment of hegemonic masculinities
  3. Sexual Minorities and sexual health
  4. Friendship bench and mental health for adolescents
  5. Regional healing cults and the case of Mutemwa
  6. Gender Dynamics in irrigation water use in Nyanyadzi
Academic Staff

Dr. P. Munasirei

munasireip@africau.edu

Academic Qualifications
  1. PhD in Rural Development
  2. M. Phil Rural Development, University of Venda (RSA), 2010
  3. B. Soc. Sc Sociology (Hons), Africa University , 2005
  4. Dip in Edu., Mutare Teachers College, 2001

Muchemwa-Munasirei P, Francis J, Chitapa TM and Moyo CS (2010). Community participation in basic service provision viewed through the lenses of villagers in post-conflict Chimanimani District of eastern Zimbabwe. In Alexander, G., van Wyk, M.M. and Teise, K. (editors), 3rd Research Colloquium: Education for Social Justice, 29-30 September 2010, Bloemfontein, South Africa. ISSN 978 0 86886 800 4 p75

Dr. Mary-Joyce Kapesa-Gohwa

Email: kapesam@africau.edu

extension 1031

Academic Qualifications
  • Ph.D. Psychology, UNISA, 2015
  • Postgrad Dip Neuropsychology, University of Jyvaskla, 2001
  • MSc. Psychology, University of Zimbabwe, 1991
  • BSc. (Hons) Psychology, University of Zimbabwe, 1991

Achievements
  1. Fulbright Visiting Scholar (Purdue University, USA),
  2. PhD Bursary Award (UNISA),
  3. Interim Dean (CSSTHE)
  4. Unit Head Psychology
Areas of Interests

Mental Health

Resilience ,Child Rights, Psychotherapy and Positive Psychology

  1. Kapesa, M. J. (2016). Child Rights and Psychosocial Support Module, AU/UNICEF module
  2. Kapesa, M. J. (2016). Reseach Methods Module, AU/UNICEF module
  3. Kapesa, M.J. (2013).Psychosocial support for OVC, Manual, Swedish Organisation for Individual Relief (SOIR), Harare, Zimbabwe
  4. Kapesa, M.J. (2013).Special Education Manual, Swedish Organisation for Individual Relief (SOIR), Harare, Zimbabwe.
  5. Kapesa, M.J. (2009)Promoting healthy lifestyles, The Mutare - Harlem HIV/AIDS Teen Prevention Program, Mutare, Zimbabwe
  6. Kapesa, M.J.(2009).Child Sexual Abuse: An analysis from the perpetrator’s perspective The World Council for Psychotherapy, African Chapter . University of Limpopo, South Africa
  7. Kapesa, M.J. (2005). HIV/AIDS and Psychotherapy – The Zimbabwean perspectiveThe World Council for Psychotherapy. African Chapter, University of Limpopo, South Africa.
  8. Kapesa, M.J. (2003). Psycho – Social Support Manual for Orphans and Vulnerable Children (OVC) Ministry of Education Better Schools Program Mat North Region, Bulawayo, Zimbabwe.
  9. Kapesa, M.J. (2002).Basic Counseling Ministry of Education Better Schools Mat North Region, Bulawayo. Zimbabwe.
  10. Kapesa, M.J (2000).Child Development module, The Commonwealth of Learning, Vancouver, Canada
  11. Kapesa, M.J (2000)Concepts of Learning module, The commonwealth of Learning, Vancouver, Canada
Ext

Mrs Clara Madziwa

madziwac@africau.edu

extension 1263

Academic Qualifications
  1. BSC Psychology (Honours), University of Zimbabwe, 1986
  2. MSC Educational Psychology, University of Zimbabwe, 1997
  3. Post Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 2005
  4. Ph.D., University of East London, 2003
  5. MA Anthropology, Johns Hopkins University, 2008
  6. MA Social Work, Boston College Graduate School of Social Work, 1990
  7. BSC (Hons) Social Work, UZ, 1987
  8. Diploma in Social work, UZ, 1983

Achievements
  1. Some day this will all be over: growing up with HIV in urban eastern Zimbabwe”, June 2010.
  2. Supervised by Professors Pamela Reynolds and Jane Guyer.
  3. (Rated one of 40 best dissertations in North American cultural anthropology in 2010 by www.anthropologyworks.org, accessed 8 June 2011

Areas of Interests
  1. Child and Family Studies,
  2. Critical Social Theory,
  3. Social Anthropology
  1. A Question of Balance: the changing face of child mental health services.” Community Care, Nov. 1995.
  2. Mirrored Grief: the systemic context of paediatric heart/heart-lung transplantation.” (With Goodwin M, Bickerton A, Lask B), Journal of Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 1996. 1:2: 265-274.
  3. ” At the Boiling Point of the Pain: assessing the need for a psychotherapy service for victims of organized violence and/or torture through attention to the narratives of survivors.” (With Farrell C, Frangoulis S), Amani Trust, Harare, 2002.
  4. “Grief-stricken: Zimbabwean children in everyday extremity and the ethics of research.” Anthropology Southern Africa. 2005 28(3&4): 73-77.
  5. “Troubling Language: re-reading a narrative of trauma from political violence in contemporary Zimbabwe.” International Journal of Critical Psychology. Special Issue: Critical Psychology in Africa. 2006. 17:29-46
  6. “HIV disclosure and discussions about grief with Shona children: a comparison between health care workers and community members in eastern Zimbabwe” (with De Baets, S Sifovo, and I Pazvakabvambwa). Social Science and Medicine 2008: 66: 479-491.
  7. “Eating in mouthfuls while facing the door: some notes on childhoods and their displacements in eastern Zimbabwe.” Journal of Southern African Studies. Special Issue: the Zimbabwe crisis through the lens of displacement. 2010: 36(2): 449-463.
  8. “Stutter and babel”: Book review of Didier Fassin and Mariella Pandolfi (Eds). ‘Contemporary States of Emergency: the politics of military and humanitarian intervention’. 2010. New York, Zone Books. Somatosphere: an online journal of science, medicine and anthropology. www.somatosphere.net. Posted October 6 2010.
  9. “One day this will all be over: growing up with HIV in an eastern Zimbabwe town”. 2012. (with photographs by Linette Frewin). Weaver Press, Harare.
  10. ‘Trauma and mental health in Zimbabwe.’ 2011. (with T Reeler, J Fisher and E Mpande). Research and Advocacy Unit, Harare. Released 4 November 2011